Mar 18 • 41M

You're smart so why do you believe in astrology?

Because it's painful and pointless to cling to the past

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Anthropological considerations of the cosmos.
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vol. 2 episode 3

woman holding moon lamp
Photo by Drew Tilk on Unsplash

Greetings,

“You’re educated. Why do you believe in astrology?”

It’s a question I get asked a lot. Or, worse, not asked, but judged quietly because I have gone to “the dark side”. Except my dark side twinkles with light and it’s beautiful.

There are those who tell me in confidence that they, too, believe in astrology, but don’t want to flaunt that. Yet, many of my peers and former colleagues (I was a clinical medicine reporter), who are 50 years of age and upwards, are mystified. Younger generation Americans and others who make up the majority of my clientele get it — they know without question how busted our current paradigm of reality is and find meaning in the archetypal metaphors the universe offers.

And, of course, there’s that I live in Washington, DC where back in the 1980s, when it became known that President Reagan had an astrologer, the field became an easy target of mockery.

Nevertheless, I persist. And with good reason. More on that in a moment.

First, I want to invite you to relax that sneer and take a deep breath. There is reason for hope in the world, even today, as bombs rain down on an innocent nation.

Regardless of how much you know about astrology, in Episode 3, Elisabeth and I make it clear how today’s Virgo full moon opposing the Sun in Pisces strongly signals that despite the grim chaos currently enveloping Eastern Europe, there are currents of hope that we all have access to right now, and how knowing how to connect with and ride them can help us calmly root to a more peaceful and productive future.

Think I am talking bull puckey?

That puts you in a growing minority of people who desire to cling to our world’s broken and outdated paradigm of pain and separation, as we discuss in this episode. The rest of us are ready to face the future with anticipation, not trepidation, nor the ersatz causes for anxiety and depression manufactured for the sake of keeping us sedated and Zombified.

And you thought The Walking Dead was just an enduring network franchise, kind of like its namesake. No. It’s a metaphor for how we’re limping through the motions of the Old World, constantly reinforced by the lazy and increasingly useless corporate media monopolies.

In the new paradigm of the living, indicated by a weirdly named but wonderfully productive celestial event called The Great Mutation, opportunities abound for making new myths that are lush with meaning, connection, and personal significance. It’s a paradigm where if you can properly read the landscape, there is a place for you to relax, feel grateful, and not harassed by the prescriptive world of hierarchy where you are supposed to know your place and not step away from it.

In this episode, we describe the signposts of this dawning world, beginning with my own impassioned, but not defensive, explanation for why I have come to see the stars as the most exquisite of navigation systems.

Elisabeth then connects the dots between the full moon in Virgo, the Sun in Pisces, the coming Spring Equinox in the Northern Hemisphere, Jupiter and Neptune’s coming conjunction in April, and a few other planetary passages that have led to this moment in time where we can see a future that is not all doom and gloom.

If you want to know more about how “conjunctions” function (sounds catchy, like School House Rock!) and retrogrades appear to move planets backward, among other astro-jargon, please listen to our first two episodes.

But you don’t need to have a tight grasp on the inner workings of astrology to understand our meaning here. All you need is a willingness to stop believing life is random and meaningless, full of drudgery and survival of the fittest.

It’s a shorter than usual episode, in part because of technical difficulties that meant I had to edit out more than I would have liked. It is an issue that you can help solve, however by becoming a member of the Ensouled community. Your material support will help us meet our high production values by allowing us to hire a producer and upgrade our equipment.

We know our content is fresh, novel, and relevant. Your support will help us become smoother, and more polished. If you’re considering supporting us but figure it’s just as easy to keep enjoying content without paying for it — we all do that somewhere, myself included — then Elisabeth and I would like to offer you a few gifts to entice you over to the paying side. Elisabeth has created a Mercury Retrograde Survival Guide she will send you if you join at any level, and I will give those who join at the $150 level a recorded astrological reading, a $125 value which you can read more about here. The offer is good through March 31, 2022.

If subscribing is not something you can do right now, there are other ways you can support us, such as sharing our podcast with others. Just forward this email to them or send them the link on your favorite podcast platform. Ensouled even has a new smart phone app you can download and share:

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As always, thank you for listening.

And don’t forget to leave your comments and to rate us on iTunes and elsewhere. We read and respond to it all.

One last thing…Look up!

Peace,

Whitney


show notes:

To read mundane astrologer and co-host of Off the Charts! Elisabeth Grace’s weekly forecast or to book an appointment with her. Visit her website.

To learn more about my own astrology consulting business, you can go here.

To listen to my podcast with author, Zen Buddhist, and business professor, Ron Purser, on his book McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality, go here:

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McMindfulness: Capitalism's spiritual sham
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And to get a giggle but also an education on how the petroleum industry makes you feel to blame for carbon emissions, Jon Stewart is right here: